Garland Brewster

Do you see a job reposted after an interview? What does it mean, and what can you do?

Interviewing

Do you see a job reposted after an interview? What does it mean, and what can you do?

Artwork by: Antonina Kasyanikova

  • What are the reasons an employer might repost a job?
  • Is there some other meaning behind my job being reposted after the interview?
  • If I see that my job was reposted, what should I do?
  • Some other things you may encounter or questions you may have
  • Key takeaways

Interviewing for a job is stressful enough, but what happens if you see the job you interviewed for posted again? This is not a major issue but can indicate a few things. We’ll tell you what it means and what to do.

So, you got through your big job interview, and you are feeling like you nailed it. Then, while you are studying the company website, you notice the exact same job reposted after your interview. Don’t panic. There are many reasons a company may repost the job after interviewing candidates.

When you see the company has reposted your job after the interview, there are a number of things that may have caused the employer to do that. We’ll talk about that, some things to consider, and what you should do. This article will cover:

  • Why a company may repost after the final interview?

  • What does it mean?

  • What should I do?

  • Other related questions.

What are the reasons an employer might repost a job?

It may be as simple as the company deciding to hire more than one person for the same role because the quantity of work requires more people. Reposting a role multiple times is not uncommon, especially if they are looking for multiple people.

  • They may also be seeking a wider population of candidates to increase their chances of finding more experienced or qualified candidates. 

  • The employer has changed their requirements or qualifications for the job. 

  • The company determined they need to consider more candidates to maintain their Equal Employment Opportunity status.

  • The job posting may have expired, and they want to keep it out there.

Is there some other meaning behind my job being reposted after the interview?

The job being reposted may be related to your interview, but more than likely it is not. Don’t get anxious about it. An employer that reposts a position will usually consider both old and new candidates. They are expanding their candidate pool to ensure they are getting the best people possible.

Do you need to resubmit your application and resume? It depends, but probably not. They have your information and know you applied for the job. However, it never hurts to follow up with them to confirm.

Another common situation is the employer feels the current candidates are not a good cultural fit for their organization. Does this mean you are out of the running? Not necessarily. Any good employer will notify you if they are no longer considering you.

If I see that my job was reposted, what should I do?

If you have not heard back from the employer for at least two weeks after your interview, don’t be depressed or take it personally. For larger companies and positions with lots of openings, it may take the employer an extended amount of time to process all the candidates.

It is completely acceptable to follow up with them. You should have already thanked them for the interview (email or phone call) within one to two business days of the interview. An additional contact after two weeks of nonresponse is still OK.

Contact them similarly (by phone call or email) and reiterate your interest and appreciation for the opportunity. Ask if they need any further information or documentation from you. Also, take the opportunity to reemphasize why you are an excellent fit for the job and what you will bring to the role.

Some other things you may encounter or questions you may have

  • What if the job reposting is different from the original?

    • In this case, it may signal the requirements have changed. You may need to resubmit your application. Follow up with the company to find out.

  • The reposting has a higher salary listed on it.

    • This may also indicate the skill sets or qualifications have changed. The employer may have decided to seek a higher level of expertise for the role. Check the job description carefully. You may need to reapply.

  • My credentials and experience have changed since my interview.

    • You will definitely need to supply a new resume and application. Contact the company to let them know your information has changed, and they should request new documentation.

  • The job posting was removed right after I interviewed.

    • Don’t get excited. This does not mean you got the job. The company may have filled its quota of candidates and is no longer accepting new applications.

  • Will a company tell you that you’re hired right after an interview?

    • Not usually. This sometimes happens, but in most cases, the hiring manager will want to look at all the candidates before they offer the job to someone.

  • The job posting is still listed or has been extended.

    • As always, don’t panic. The company has reasons to do this that are totally unrelated to your interview.

  • The company still has not gotten back to me, and it has been a long time.

    • This is not personal, so don’t take it that way. Most HR departments and hiring managers are very busy, and they have many tasks to do. It may take a while for them to get back to you. If it has been over two weeks (10 business days), then it is fair to contact them to see where you stand.

  • I see that the job is still advertised or has been re-advertised.

    • No need to worry. This is similar to the posting still being out there. The company is probably still gathering candidates or wants to increase the applicant pool.

Key takeaways

Seeing the job you just interviewed for being reposted (or is still posted) is not a catastrophe. 

  1. Don’t be discouraged. This does not mean you didn’t get the job.

  2. The most likely reason for reposting a job is the employer needs to extend the applicant pool or time needed to fill the position.

  3. It is possible the job requirements have changed. Study the reposted job carefully to see if there are any changes.

  4. If your situation has changed, and it affects your resume or requirements, then follow up with the employer to inform them immediately.

  5. When you see the position get reposted, and you are unsure if you are still in the running for the position, contact the hiring manager or interviewer to confirm.

Looking for a new job is exciting, but it is also almost always challenging. Stay positive, patient, and tenacious throughout the process. If you can do these things, then you will undoubtedly land that great new position!

Garland Brewster

Garland is a writer and technology consultant that lives in far west Texas, USA. He is semi-retired from a successful 25-year career in the IT industry, and now spends his time writing for various websites (mostly jobseeker related) and working on constructing his off-grid desert home. Garland holds a bachelor’s degree in Accounting and Finance, and a master’s degree in Economics and Computer Information Systems.

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